Journey of a Serial Entrepreneur

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How to get from where you are to where you want to be

5 Components to build Trust

“Self-trust is the first secret of success.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

This series started with a post regarding how the trust I had in PayPal was shaken when my account got compromised. In life, our trust in people and businesses will often be tested. That is life, and we have to accept it. The fact of the matter is, without trust, we would not get far in life. The trust building process comprises of several components. Each of them plays a vital role in the process, and provides us with  benchmarks to help achieve the level of trust required. 

1. Integrity: Integrity is based purely on the actions and decisions we make in life. They reflect who we are and what we stand for. Three measures to use to benchmark our own level of integrity are ; firstly, are we congruent in our thoughts, words and actions? The second one is, do we honor our promises and commitments to ourselves and others? The last one, do we possess the courage to stand up for our values and beliefs in the face of resistance? These questions can serve as a guide to learn more about personal and business integrity levels. To read more about trust and integrity please click here.

2. Competence: Competence is a pre-requisite for the process of trust building. An individual or business is deemed competent in a particular skill set when they have proved themselves adequately. However, for a new startup, without a track record, this is a challenging task. Competence needs to be communicated through actions in a younger team. Using academic credentials, talents and skill sets or references can be used to help prove a younger team’s ability and capability. To read more about trust and competence please click here.

3. Consistent Communication: We have all come across businesses where senior management says one thing, middle management says another and the customer service representative says something completely different. When there is inconsistency in communication, building trust will be an arduous task. As younger startup companies, we have to instill the importance of consistent communication, from the beginning of our operations. This includes the alignment of senior management’s agenda, marketing strategies as well as how customer service representatives are supposed to interact with clients. To read more about the importance of consistent communication and trust please click here.

4. Genuine Concern: An individual or business can have high levels of integrity, be competent and communicate with consistency, yet, a lack of genuine concern for others or your customers, will dramatically slow down the trust building process. I believe a genuine concern for your customer with honest intention is the ‘x-factor’ in the trust building process. It is important that we get a deep understanding of our clients needs and wants and craft our strategies around them. It is only when we are able to communicate the importance of this component to the rest of the team in the form of actions will we actually notice results. To read more about trust and genuine concern please click here.

5. Results: Results and past performance speak louder than any number of words. The world today benchmarks each and everyone of us to what we have achieved. Therefore, as young entrepreneurs, we must pay a great deal of attention to proving ourselves and showing tangible results. These can be in the form of academic achievements, extra curricular achievements or projects where we have documented results. It is important to become result and action oriented. When an individual has a reputation of getting the job done well, the ability to gain the trust and confidence of peers, investors and customers is enhanced. To read more about trust and results please click here.

Building and maintaining trust is a challenging task. It requires constant attention, and the slightest of slips in our behavior has severe negative impact on the level of trust. As we all know, once a vase is broken it can be put back together, but it will never be the same. The components talked about in this post are foundational elements in the trust building process. When we have the trust of a customer or friend it dramatically changes the dynamics of the relationship, to one where a lot more can be achieved. As entrepreneurs, we must strive to develop a reputation of one who can be trusted. This will have a phenomenal positive impact on the level of business as well as your life. 

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Results

“You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do.” Henry Ford

As a young entrepreneur, some questions you hear repeatedly from prospective customers are, “Who is currently using your product/service?” or “How many users do you currently have on your system?”  These questions are asked with the aim to establish whether the prospect can trust your business to deliver what you are pitching, and whether the team has the appropriate capabilities and skill sets. Not many individuals want to be the first customer to test a brand new product/service, it is hence up to the entrepreneur to convince the customer why they should use their product/service. The question that arises is “How does an entrepreneur convince a customer to trust him to deliver on his word?”. I believe the fastest way to do this, is to reference past performance and results, and use them as benchmarks to make a convincing argument. 

Results and past performance speak louder than any number of words. The world today benchmarks each and everyone of us to what we have achieved. For example, take an individual with high levels of integrity, extremely competent, communicates consistently and has a genuine concern for what he/she is doing. However, if this individual does not have a track record of delivering when given a task, chances are that they are not going to be given a chance to step up to the plate. Therefore, as entrepreneurs, we have to constantly look for ways to prove to customers, stakeholders, investors, employees and the media that we have what it takes to succeed. We cannot wait around for things to happen or wait for the ‘right’ opportunity. Action needs to be taken, and positive results need to follow. Will we always get the results we want? Unfortunately not. However, if we persevere and pursue what we want to achieve relentlessly results will follow.

Some areas where younger entrepreneurs can display results they have achieved are:

1. Academics: This works well when you are raising early stage angel or venture funding. If one has achieved success in the form of honor rolls, awards or other recognition for academic pursuits, they should be included in some way in your pitch. From a customer’s point of view, having someone with deep theoretical knowledge about your product/service adds great value.

2. Extra Curricular: Including any information about areas such as sports, debate societies, student unions or charitable efforts one has been part of, also adds value.  A personal example is,  when I co-founded an entrepreneurship society at university, which has since grown from 10 members in Singapore, to over 2500 spread across all of Asia today. It was through this platform that I gained a valuable network, and built trust with many of my mentors today. Other examples could be contributions to charitable organizations and events, and funds you may have raised for them.

3. Projects & Initiatives: Results can only be achieved when you take initiatives and actions. Highlight areas where you took an initiative, such as, starting a blog, a website, a store on ebay, freelance projects or any other example where you have documented results. Such projects go to show that you are willing to go the extra mile to reach you goals. 

Once the business has established customers, continue to track results through all business processes. Take responsibility for all the results you get, be they positive or negative. I have found that the learning process is specially instructive when we do not get the results we want. I have repeated this many a time, there is no failure, only feedback. Once you have established a solid track record, and have been identified as a result oriented team member, the level of trust your peers will have in you, will sky rocket. 

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Rewards and Recognitions for teams

“In the arena of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.” – Aristotle

Your startup seems to be coming along well. You have put a lot of fundamental building blocks into place and motivation in the work place is high. Along the course of the year you will have performance reviews and will monitor closely your progress in reaching stipulated goals. Through the course of time, high performers will appear as well as those who are not pulling their weight. To tackle this situation, startups have to take a look at their performance reviews as well as their “Rewards & Recognition” plan closely. This is something which is new to me. The need for this sort of planning appeared when I was part of teams and noticed that high performers were not being suitably rewarded compared to those who had mediocre performances. Such plans are always passed over as they cause substantial ruffling of feathers in a team. Over time I have learned that this sort of competition for rewards and recognition is healthy for an organization and a team to push themselves further.

Firstly the work that your team members are doing for the business is an investment. In return for this investment they are hoping for a substantially higher return given the amount of risk associated. Thus in the first critical meeting we have allocated who gets what given that this is a start up enterprise. For example there are 4 team members who get together to start an online business which would be selling used textbooks to university students. The equity in the company is decided to be spread equally. Everyone is delegated tasks and specific goals in areas of management, sales, technical and customer service. Apart from those tasks everyone is always on the lookout for used books sources and channels to sell them through (being part of a startup company is as easy as it seems). At this stage I have found it helpful to allocate:

1. Overall team performance rewards.

2. Individual performance rewards and recognition.

These should be discussed and agreed upon by all team members. I have made the mistake in the past of personally allocating the rewards and recognitions to the teams I was leading. That didn’t work well. You have to get all your team members together and ask them what sort of rewards are important to them and what they think would be appropriate benchmarks and percentages. So make everyone a part of this process and you will churn out a winning rewards and recognition plan by your team mates for your team mates.

Team performance can be set at a target to sell 1000 used text books in the month of Jan. For every additional book sold the entire team will share 5% of the profit according to equity split.

For individual performance those who perform exceedingly well on their delegated tasks as well as surpass their monthly sales quota will receive an additional 20% of the profit from the surplus of the books they sold. Along with that the top performer’s efforts will be celebrated courtesy of the rest of his team members.

I have been amazed at how effective this has been in teams where it has been executed correctly. There are a couple of team configurations which make such rewards and recognitions difficult to deploy. However what this article hopes to get across is that rewards and recognition are essential in creating a culture in your organization which celebrates outstanding performance. It makes those individual who are not pushing themselves hard enough to do so and creates an almost electric environment when things are moving well and fast.

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